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Vol.52 (2006) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.fmu.ac.jp/dspace/handle/123456789/197

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Title: Effects of fluvoxamine on behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in Alzheimer's disease: a report of three cases
Other Titles: Effects of fluvoxamine on BPSD in AD
Authors: Kurita, Masatake
Sato, Tadahiro
Nishino, Satoshi
Ohtomo, Koji
Shirakawa, Hisayoshi
Mashiko, Hirobumi
Niwa, Shin-Ichi
Nakahata, Norimichi
Affiliation: 神経精神医学講座
Source title: Fukushima Journal of Medical Science
Volume: 52
Issue: 2
Start page: 143
End page: 148
Issue Date: Dec-2006
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To report 3 cases of severe behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) with fluvoxamine treatment and to discuss the treatment implications for use of the drug. CASE SUMMARY: An 83-year-old woman was diagnosed with AD. Before treatment, she showed sudden irritation and excitement. Her BEHAVE-AD score was 40. She was started on fluvoxamine and quetiapine. Eight weeks later, she was friendly and thankful towards the staff. Her BEHAVE-AD score was 10. The second case was a 79-year-old woman diagnosed with AD. Before treatment, she attempted to leave our hospital and wandered and shouted throughout the day. Her BEHAVE-AD score was 42. She was started on fluvoxamine, and the dosage was gradually increased. Eight weeks later, the shouting and excitement disappeared almost completely. Her BEHAVE-AD score was 13. The third case was a 79-year-old man diagnosed with AD. Before treatment, we put him in a private, locked room because he was extremely agitated and violent because of delusions. His BEHAVE-AD score was 42. He was started on fluvoxamine and sodium valproate. Eight weeks later, the delusion became mild and did not affect his mood or behavior. His BEHAVE-AD score at this point was 4. DISCUSSION: Fluvoxamine was effective in controlling BPSD with AD. This finding shows that the pathophysiology of BPSD due to AD may occur because of a hyposerotonergic state in the brain. CONCLUSION: These cases show that fluvoxamine appears to be effective in the control of BPSD with AD.
Publisher: The Fukushima Society of Medical Science
Publisher (Alternative foam): 福島医学会
language: eng
URI: http://ir.fmu.ac.jp/dspace/handle/123456789/197
Full text URL: http://ir.fmu.ac.jp/dspace/bitstream/123456789/197/1/FksmJMedSci_52_p143.pdf
ISSN: 0016-2590
PubMed ID: 17427765
Rights: © 2006 The Fukushima Society of Medical Science
Appears in Collections:Vol.52 (2006)

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